top of page
Small Lev Aharon Logo

Lev Aharon Library

/

עשרת המכות

/

דרוש, מוסר ומחשבה

לימודם של חנניה מישאל ועזריה מן הצפרדעים

הובא בגמרא (פסחים נג, ב): "דרש תודוס איש רומי, מה ראו חנניה מישאל ועזריה שמסרו עצמן על קדושת השם לכבשן האש – נשאו קל וחומר בעצמן מצפרדעים, ומה צפרדעים, שאין מצווין על קדושת השם, כתיב בהו ועלו ובאו בביתך [וגו'] ובתנוריך ובמשארותיך. אימתי משארות מצויות אצל תנור, הוי אומר בשעה שהתנור חם, אנו, שמצווין על קדושת השם, על אחת כמה וכמה".

והנה, ישנן מספר תמיהות בדברי הגמרא הללו:

ראשית, תמיהת המהרש"א בחידושי אגדות שם, זה לשונו, ומיהו, האי ק"ו פריכא הוא, דהצפרדעים, גם שלא היו מצווין על קידוש השם, מכל מקום קדשו השם כיון דלא נצטוו על "וחי בהם וגו'", אבל חנניה וחביריו, גם שהיו מצווין על קדוש השם בפרהסיא, מכל מקום, הכא בצנעא דלא היו מצווין על קידוש השם, לא הוה להן למסור עצמן כיון דנצטוו על וחי בהן וכו', עכ"ל. והיינו, שאפשר לפרוך את הקל וחומר ולומר שאין ללמוד מן הצפרדעים שיש למסור את הנפש, לפי שיתכן שדוקא עליהם הוטל לנהוג כן מאחר ואין בכך סתירה לחיוב אחר, שלא נצטוו על 'וחי בהם', אבל על אדם, שנצטווה ב'וחי בהם', ומסירות הנפש נוגדת חיוב זה, לא הוטל למסור.

תמיהה נוספת שישנה בענין היא תמיהתו של השאגת אריה (הובא בספר פנינים משולחן הגר"א), שמה ראיה הביאו חנניה מישאל ועזריה מן הצפרדעים, והלא הם נצטוו בכך בפירוש, במאמרו של הקב"ה לפרעה ביד משה "ועלו ובאו וגו' ובתנוריך".

קושיא נוספת היא קושית התוספות (פסחים שם ד"ה מה), שהקשו, לשם מה נזקקו חנניה מישאל ועזריה ללמוד זאת מקל וחומר מן הצפרדעים, והלא חיוב יהרג ואל יעבור בעבודה זרה ידוע ומפורסם הוא, כדאיתא בסנהדרין (עד, א), דלכולי עלמא בפרהסיא חייב למסור עצמו אפילו על מצוה קלה. ותירצו התוספות, שצלמו של נבוכדנצר לא היה עבודה זרה ממש אלא אינדרטא שעשה לכבוד עצמו, ולא חל על ההשתחוואה לה החיוב של יהרג ולא יעבור.

Note! Translation is auto generated: Please use with caution

The study of Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah from the frogs

It is brought in the Gemara (Pesachim 53b): "Tuddus of Rome expounded: What did Chananiah, Mishael, and Azariah see that made them surrender themselves to the fiery furnace for the sanctification of God's name? They reasoned a fortiori from the frogs. If the frogs, who are not commanded concerning the sanctification of God's name, it is written about them 'and they shall come up and go into your house [etc.] and into your ovens and into your kneading troughs.' When are kneading troughs found near the oven? You must say, when the oven is hot. Then we, who are commanded concerning the sanctification of God's name, all the more so."

Now, there are several questions about these words of the Gemara:

Firstly, the Maharsha's question in Chiddushei Aggadot there, his words are: "However, this a fortiori reasoning is flawed, because the frogs, although they were not commanded concerning the sanctification of God's name, nevertheless sanctified God's name since they were not commanded 'and live by them, etc.' But Chananiah and his companions, although they were commanded concerning the sanctification of God's name in public, nevertheless, here in private where they were not commanded concerning the sanctification of God's name, they should not have surrendered themselves since they were commanded 'and live by them, etc.'" Meaning, one could refute the a fortiori argument and say that we cannot learn self-sacrifice from the frogs, since it might be that it was specifically imposed upon them because there was no contradiction to another obligation, as they were not commanded 'and live by them.' But for a person who is commanded 'and live by them,' and self-sacrifice contradicts this obligation, it is not imposed to surrender.

Another question concerning this matter is raised by the Sha'agat Aryeh (brought in the book Peninim Mishulchan HaGra), which is: What proof did Chananiah, Mishael, and Azariah bring from the frogs, for they were explicitly commanded in this matter by God's statement to Pharaoh through Moshe 'and they shall come up and go [etc.] into your ovens'?

Another issue is the Tosafot's question (Pesachim there, s.v. Ma), where they ask, why did Chananiah, Mishael, and Azariah need to learn this a fortiori from the frogs, for the obligation of "be killed and do not transgress" concerning idolatry is well-known and famous, as stated in Sanhedrin (74a), that everyone agrees that in public one must surrender oneself even for a minor commandment. Tosafot answer that Nebuchadnezzar's statue was not actual idolatry but a statue he made for his own honor, and the obligation of "be killed and do not transgress" did not apply to bowing to it.

bottom of page